Cover

 

JANE AUSTEN

 

A COLLECTION

OF

LETTERS

 

 

 

An early work by the famous author of

Pride and Prejudice

 

 


 

A COLLECTION OF LETTERS by Jane Austen

 

This edition published by apebook

© apebook Verlag, Essen (Germany)

 

www.apebook.de

 

1st edition 2017

 

 

 

 

 

This book is part of the ApeBook Classics (ABC, No. 0025): Classical Masterworks of Literature (paperback and eBook).

For further information take a look at the end of the book and also visit: www.apebook.de

 

ISBN 978-3-96130-098-3

 

Cover design by SkriptArt

  www.skriptart.de

 

All rights reserved.

© apebook 2017

 

 

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To Miss COOPER

COUSIN Conscious of the Charming Character which in every Country, and every Clime in Christendom is Cried, Concerning you, with Caution and Care I Commend to your Charitable Criticism this Clever Collection of Curious Comments, which have been Carefully Culled, Collected and Classed by your Comical Cousin

The Author.

Table of Contents

A collection of letters

Impressum

LETTER the FIRST

LETTER the SECOND

LETTER the THIRD

LETTER the FOURTH

LETTER the FIFTH

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LETTER the FIRST

From a MOTHER to her FREIND

My Children begin now to claim all my attention in different Manner from that in which they have been used to receive it, as they are now arrived at that age when it is necessary for them in some measure to become conversant with the World, My Augusta is 17 and her sister scarcely a twelvemonth younger. I flatter myself that their education has been such as will not disgrace their appearance in the World, and that THEY will not disgrace their Education I have every reason to beleive. Indeed they are sweet Girls—. Sensible yet unaffected—Accomplished yet Easy—. Lively yet Gentle—. As their progress in every thing they have learnt has been always the same, I am willing to forget the difference of age, and to introduce them together into Public. This very Evening is fixed on as their first ENTREE into Life, as we are to drink tea with Mrs Cope and her Daughter. I am glad that we are to meet no one, for my Girls sake, as it would be awkward for them to enter too wide a Circle on the very first day. But we shall proceed by degrees.—Tomorrow Mr Stanly's family will drink tea with us, and perhaps the Miss Phillips's will meet them. On Tuesday we shall pay Morning Visits—On Wednesday we are to dine at Westbrook. On Thursday we have Company at home. On Friday we are to be at a Private Concert at Sir John Wynna's—and on Saturday we expect Miss Dawson to call in the Morning—which will complete my Daughters Introduction into Life. How they will bear so much dissipation I cannot imagine; of their spirits I have no fear, I only dread their health.