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An Intimate Study of Sherlock Holmes

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AN INTIMATE STUDY OF SHERLOCK HOLMES

 

 

 

By His Creator

 

SIR ARTHUR CONAN DOYLE

 

From Detective Story Magazine, January 15, 1918

 

 

 

 

Table of Contents

An Intimate Study of Sherlock Holmes

Impressum

Text

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AN INTIMATE STUDY OF SHERLOCK HOLMES was originally published in Detective Story Magazine, January 15, 1918.

 

This edition published by apebook

© apebook Verlag, Essen (Germany)

 

www.apebook.de

 

1st edition 2018

 

 

 

 

 

This book is part of the ApeBook Classics (ABC, No. 0034): Classical Masterworks of Literature (paperback and eBook). For further information take a look at the end of the book and also visit: www.apebook.de

 

ISBN 978-3-96130-108-9

 

Cover by SkriptArt, www.skriptart.de

 

All rights reserved.

© apebook 2018

 

 

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    At the request of the editor, I have spent some days in looking over an old letter box in which, from time to time, I have placed letters referring directly or indirectly to the notorious Mr. Holmes. I wish now that I had been more careful in preserving the references to this gentleman and his little problems. A great many have been lost or mislaid. His biographer has been fortunate enough to find readers in many lands, and the reading has elicited the same sort of response, though in many cases that response has been in a tongue difficult to comprehend. Very often my distant correspondent could neither spell my own name or that of my imaginary hero, as in a recent instance which I here append.

 

 

    Many such letters have been from Russians. Where the Russian letters have been in the vernacular, I have been compelled, I am afraid, to take them as read; but when they had been in English, they have been among the most curious in my collection.

    There was one young lady who began all her epistles with the words “Good Lord.” Another had a large amount of guile underlying her simplicity. Writing from Warsaw, she stated that she had been bedridden for two years, and that my novels had been her only et cetera, et cetera. So touched was I by this flattering statement that I at once prepared an autographed parcel of them to complete the fair invalid’s collection. By good luck, however, I met a brother author upon the same day to whom I recounted the touching incident. With a cynical smile, he drew an identical letter from his pocket. His novels also had been for two years her only et cetera, et cetera. I do not know how many more the lady had written to; but if, as I imagine, her correspondence had extended to several countries, she must have amassed a rather interesting library.