Details

The Gender of Informal Politics


The Gender of Informal Politics

Russia, Iceland and Twenty-First Century Male Dominance
Gender and Politics

von: Janet Elise Johnson

118,99 €

Verlag: Palgrave Macmillan
Format: PDF
Veröffentl.: 12.09.2017
ISBN/EAN: 9783319602790
Sprache: englisch

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Beschreibungen

This book argues that the primary political obstacle holding women back in the twenty-first century is a bait and switch promising but simultaneously undercutting gender equality. Through a comparison of Russia and Iceland, the book shows how this revised form of male dominance came about, how it constrains feminisms, and how activists are beginning to fight back. It argues that while feminist movements have made it harder for most countries to maintain formal rules discriminating against women, economic liberalization strengthened male-dominated elites in informal institutions. These elites offer women prominent roles as policymakers and in non-governmental organizations, but then box them in with little room to represent women’s interests. Activists’ attempts to shame countries for ignoring problems such as violence against women result in new laws, but, lacking the necessary funding and enforcement, violence and inequality intensify. Explaining this paradox is the principal focus for social scientists, policymakers, and activists concerned with gender equality, women's social inclusion, and human rights.  
Chapter 1. Introduction: Informal politics and the gender equality paradox.- Chapter 2. Liberalization: How economic reforms consolidated a bait-and-switch male dominance.- Chapter 3. Women’s representation: How bait-and-switch male dominance promotes, but then boxes in women in politics.- Chapter 4. Women’s/Feminist mobilization: How bait-and-switch male dominance undermines feminism and how feminists fight back.- Chapter 5. Gender equality: How bait-and-switch male dominance undermines gender equality policymaking.- Chapter 6. Conclusion: A feminist theory of corruption.
Janet Elise Johnson is Professor of Political Science at Brooklyn College, City University of New York, USA, and Visiting Scholar, Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, New York University. Her books include Gender Violence in Russia (2009) and Living Gender after Communism (2006).
This book argues that the primary political obstacle holding women back in the twenty-first century is a bait and switch promising but simultaneously undercutting gender equality. Through a comparison of Russia and Iceland, the book shows how this revised form of male dominance came about, how it constrains feminisms, and how activists are beginning to fight back. It argues that while feminist movements have made it harder for most countries to maintain formal rules discriminating against women, economic liberalization strengthened male-dominated elites in informal institutions. These elites offer women prominent roles as policymakers and in non-governmental organizations, but then box them in with little room to represent women’s interests. Activists’ attempts to shame countries for ignoring problems such as violence against women result in new laws, but, lacking the necessary funding and enforcement, violence and inequality intensify. Explaining this paradox is the principal focus for social scientists, policymakers, and activists concerned with gender equality, women's social inclusion, and human rights.  
Compares economic liberalization, women’s presence in politics, feminism, and gender equality policy-making in Iceland and RussiaProvides a theoretical understanding of male dominance as an integral part of gender politicsIntroduces a new way of looking at the gender equality paradox by using the concept of 'bait-and-switch politics'
“This is a groundbreaking book. Focusing on one of the big questions of our time– why has the formal inclusion of women into politics, and introduction of gender equality legislation, left male power intact? – Johnson provides a sophisticated analysis that puts informal rules at the forefront.  Fresh, insightful and original, this is a must read for anyone interested in gender and comparative politics.” (Professor Louise Chappell, University of New South Wales, Australia) “While we might expect to see robust efforts at gender equality in Iceland, and be dubious about that likelihood in Russia, this important feminist analysis of the informal political realm explains why some forms of gender inequality remain entrenched in both countries.  For readers seeking to understand – or undermine – this situation, Johnson’s book is a vital guide.” (Professor Valerie Sperling, Clark University, USA)